VI. Outcomes Quality Indicators

Outcomes are the desired difference that the chaplain’s contribution to the care of the patient/client, family and/or staff may help bring about. They are an observed and witnessed change in the person’s ability to cope and/or adapt; a measurable “turn-around” point or points. (VandeCreek and Lucas. 2001).

 

Outcome Indicator 3.A.

Quality Indicator: Clients’ spiritual needs are met. (Balboni, et.al. 2007)

Metric: Client-reported spiritual needs documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tools: Spiritual Needs Assessment Inventory for Patients (SNAP) (Sharma R, et al. 2012) and Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ) (Bussing A, et al. 2010)

 

Outcome Indicator 3.B.

Quality Indicator: Spiritual care increases client satisfaction. (Marin et al. 2015)

Metric: Client-reported satisfaction documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tools: HCAHPS #21 (Giordano L, et al. 2009), and QSC (Daaleman T, et al. 2014)

 

Outcome Indicator 3.C.

Quality Indicator: Spiritual care reduces spiritual distress. (Snowdon A, et al. 2013)

Metric: Client-reported spiritual distress documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tool: “Are you experiencing spiritual pain right now?” (Mako, C et al. 2006)

 

Outcome Indicator 3.D.

Quality Indicator: Spiritual interventions increase client’’ sense of peace. (Snowdon A, et al. 2013).

Metric: Client-reported peace measure documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tools: Facit-SP-Peace Subscale (Peterman A, et al. 2002), and “Are You at Peace?” (Steinhauser K, et al. 2006)

 

Outcome Indicator 3.E.

Quality Indicator: Spiritual care facilitates meaning-making for clients and family members. (Flannelly K. et al. 2005)

Metric: Client-reported measure of meaning documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tools: Facit-SP-Meaning Subscale (Peterman A, et al. 2002,) and RCOPE (Pargament K, et al. 2000)

 

Outcome Indicator 3.F.

Quality Indicator: Spiritual care increases spiritual well-being. (Rabow M and Knish S. 2014)

Metric: Client-reported spiritual well-being documented before and after spiritual care

Suggested Tool: Facit-SP (Peterman A, et al. 2002)

 

3.A.-3.F. Outcomes Indicators Competencies

The competencies listed below were determined to apply to all of the outcomes for Indicators 3.A through 3.F, and, therefore, are listed as a group rather than repeating the same list for each competency.

  1. The chaplain integrates theories from the behavioral sciences into spiritual care practice.
  2. The chaplain integrates spiritual, existential and emotional concepts for clients and families in spiritual care, including faith, hope, forgiveness, meaning and remorse.
  3. The chaplain integrates a thorough knowledge of chaplaincy practice into interventions to support the client’s identified religious, spiritual, existential or cultural beliefs and values.
  4. The chaplain utilizes evidence-based practices in spiritual care and chaplaincy to improve spiritual care service.
  5. The chaplain understands and abides by the ethical standards of care giving in general and chaplaincy in particular.
  6. The chaplain effectively uses best practice in communication, including listening habits and techniques.
  7. The chaplain effectively and appropriately uses supportive responses with clients who experience traumatic events so that they can manage the situation and respond appropriately.
  8. The chaplain utilizes evidence-based practices to help clients and families address their fears, as well as distress (spiritual and otherwise) related to chronic, serious, life-limiting illness, and/or end-of-life care.

 

Outcomes Indictors 3.A.-3.F. What Do I Need to Know?

Test candidates should have knowledge of the definition of outcomes in chaplaincy care, best practices, and processes by which to consistently demonstrate them in their own practice.

Reading: Spiritual Pain Among Patients with Advanced Cancer in Palliative Care. (Mako C, et al. 2006)

Outcome Indicators 3.A.-3.F. Sample Question

Spiritual distress or “spiritual pain” typically falls into three main categories:

    1. Interpersonal, resilience, and relationship with God
    2. Intrapsychic, theological and physical
    3. Resilience, sense of peace, and meaning-making
    4. Intrapsychic, interpersonal, and the divine

Correct answer: d. Source: Spiritual Pain Among Patients with Advanced Cancer in Palliative Care. (Mako C, et al. 2006)